Classical Baby — The Poetry Show, list and text of poems

Classical Baby series are dearly loved by my children.

One of them is The Poetry Show. You can watch some parts of it on The Poetry Foundation site

Here is the list of the poems from it:

1. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

2. The Swing by Robert Louis Stevenson

3. The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams

4. Grassy Grass Grass by Woody Guthrie

5. The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear

6. Sonnet XVIII by William Shakespeare

7. Mariposa by Federico Garcia Lorca

8. This is just to say by William Carlos Williams

9 Skylark by Johnny Mercer

10. April Rain Song by Langston Hughes

11. A very valentine by Gertrude Syein

12. Who has seen the wind? by Christina Rosetti

13 How Do I love thee? by Elisabeth Barrett Browning

 

After watching it a few times my daughter wanted to find the poems in her poetry books and read them ourselves, which made for a fun activity.

But if you do not have the books at home, we have collected the poems for you! Now you can print them out and enjoy reading along.

Poems are great for developing language fluency, comprehension, vocabulary and helping children discover the harmony of our beautiful language.

So here is our Poetry Show collection:

 

Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening

 Whose woods these are I think I know.
 His house is in the village though;
 He will not see me stopping here
 To watch his woods fill up with snow.
 My little horse must think it queer
 To stop without a farmhouse near
 Between the woods and frozen lake
 The darkest evening of the year.
 He gives his harness bells a shake
 To ask if there is some mistake.
 The only other sound’s the sweep
 Of easy wind and downy flake.
 The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
 But I have promises to keep,
 And miles to go before I sleep,
 And miles to go before I sleep.

The Swing

How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!
Up in the air and over the wall,
Till I can see so wide,
River and trees and cattle and all
Over the countryside–
Till I look down on the garden green,
Down on the roof so brown–
Up in the air I go flying again,
Up in the air and down!

Robert Louis Stevenson

 

The Red Wheelbarrow 

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens.

“The Red Wheelbarrow” is published by Carcanet Press in the Collected Poems of William Carlos Williams, Volume 1

 

Grassy Grass Grass 
Words and Music by Woody Guthrie

Grass grass grass,
tree tree tree,
leafy leaf leaf,
one two three.

Birdy birdy bird,
fly fly fly,
nest nest nest,
high high high.

Cloudy cloudy cloud,
wind wind wind,
rain rain rain,
mud mud mud,

Doggie doggie,
dog runy run run,
quickie quick quick,
homey home home.

Bedy bed bed
sheety sheet sheet,
sleepy sleep sleep,
dreamy dream dream.

Dancie dance dance,
singy sing sing,
grow grow grow,
biggy big big.

 

The Owl and the Pussy-cat

The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea
   In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
   Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
   And sang to a small guitar,
“O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
    What a beautiful Pussy you are,
         You are,
         You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!”
Pussy said to the Owl, “You elegant fowl!
   How charmingly sweet you sing!
O let us be married! too long we have tarried:
   But what shall we do for a ring?”
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
   To the land where the Bong-Tree grows
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood
   With a ring at the end of his nose,
             His nose,
             His nose,
   With a ring at the end of his nose.
“Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
   Your ring?” Said the Piggy, “I will.”
So they took it away, and were married next day
   By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
   Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
   They danced by the light of the moon,
             The moon,
             The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.

Source: The Random House Book of Poetry for Children (1983)

SONNET #18

by: William Shakespeare

ShallHALL I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed:
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st,
Nor shall Death brag thou wand’rest in his shade
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st.
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

This is just to say

I have eaten the plums

that were in the icebox

and which you were probably saving for breakfast

Forgive me

they were delicious

so sweet

and so cold

Skylark

Skylark, have you anything to say to me?
Won’t you tell me where my love can be?
Is there a meadow in the mist
where someone’s waiting to be kissed?

Skylark, have you seen a valley green with spring
where my heart can go a journeying
over the shadows and the rain
to a blossom covered lane?

And in your lonely flight
haven’t you heard the music in the night,
wonderful music,
faint as a will o’ the wisp, crazy as a loon,
sad as a gypsy serenading the moon.

Oh, skylark, I don’t know if you can find these things
but my heart is riding on your wings.
So if you see them anywhere
won’t you lead me there?

April Rain Song

Let the rain kiss you.
Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops.
Let the rain sing you a lullaby.

The rain makes still pools on the sidewalk.

The rain makes running pools in the gutter.
The rain plays a little sleep-song on our roof at night—

And I love the rain.

Langston Hughes, “April Rain Song” from Collected Poems.

 A Very Valentine

Very fine is my valentine.

Very fine and very mine.

Very mine is my valentine very mine and very fine.

Very fine is my valentine and mine, very fine very mine and mine is my valentine.

Who has seen the wind?

Who has seen the wind?
Neither I nor you:
But when the leaves hang trembling,
The wind is passing through.
Who has seen the wind?
Neither you nor I:
But when the trees bow down their heads,
The wind is passing by.

Source: The Golden Book of Poetry (1947)

How do I love thee?

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of every day’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

 

Enjoy!

And stay tuned for some fun facts we found about each poem!